Tagged: content moderation Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Geebo 9:03 am on July 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Channel 4, content moderation, , Inside Facebook: Secrets of the Social Network,   

    Documentary: Facebook needs controversy to survive 

    Documentary: Facebook needs controversy to survive

    Have you ever seen something posted on Facebook that was so offensive that you actually took the time to complain to Facebook? I did once. I saw a post accusing a man of a horrible crime even though there was no tangible evidence to support the claim. That was three years ago and this particular post has since been shared millions of times as if it was fact. For all I know, this man’s life could have been ruined due to false accusations. The response I got from Facebook on multiple occasions on why the post wasn’t deleted was because it did not violate their nebulous ‘community standards’. Now, a soon to be released documentary claims this is par for the course when it comes to Facebook moderation.

    British TV broadcaster Channel 4 had a journalist go undercover in a firm that is contracted to moderate Facebook content. The documentary entitled “Inside Facebook: Secrets of the Social Network.” claims that Facebook allows controversial content like this to proliferate on its network because it keeps people more engrossed in Facebook’s walled garden. This, in turn, is said to increase Facebook’s revenue through advertisements. That makes it sound a lot like Facebook is profiting from the suffering of others since most of the controversial material that isn’t deleted consists of instances of child abuse according to Business Insider.

    In a world where discourse is becoming increasingly toxic, Facebook appears to be throwing gasoline on the fire while making money by selling pitchforks and torches. Facebook denies these claims but the evidence seems to indicate the contrary. However, as usual, the problem could be solved if we all did one thing. That is for us to start using social media more responsibly and not sharing every little thing that causes us the slightest bit of outrage. It’s time for us to start using social media with a more discerning eye.

     
  • Geebo 9:07 am on October 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: content moderation, ,   

    Facebook to manually review ads, so why don’t others? 

    Facebook to manually review ads, so why don't others?

    Facebook has come under fire recently for allegedly accepting money for ads from a Russian entity known as the Internet Research Agency. For two years these ads ran which intended to fuel the fires of rampant political discord already troubling our country. Some of the ads could have even been viewed as racist or anti-Semitic. After turning over records of these ads to Congress, Facebook announced they would be hiring 1000 people to manually review certain ads targeted toward religious, ethnic, and social groups.

    However, this blog post ultimately is not about Facebook, but another website that touts itself as being socially responsible. We’re of course referring to craigslist. From its iconic purple peace sign logo to the numerous charitable foundations craigslist founder Craig Newmark has donated to, craigslist appears on the surface to be this socially conscious entity, yet they still do nothing to try to protect their own users.

    Craigslist ads remain largely unmoderated which has led to a vast number of scams and violent crimes. Their rants & raves section is filled all sorts of vitriol and hate from blatant racism to calls for violence. Their casual encounters section is often the playground of child predators looking for their next victim. Yet craigslist does not hire any moderators, refusing to expand from their alleged two dozen employees.

    While craigslist may not be as lucrative as Facebook, I think they could probably scrounge enough to money to hire a team of moderators. They just choose not to.

     
  • Geebo 9:01 am on July 5, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: content moderation, , , Slate   

    Craigslist has nothing to teach Facebook 

    Craigslist has nothing to teach Facebook

    Noted news and opinion website Slate recently published an article entitled “What Facebook Can Learn From Craigslist”. One could assume by the headline that Slate must mean craigslist can teach Facebook something about Facebook Marketplace, but that’s not the point Slate is trying to make. Instead, Slate makes the questionable claim craigslist has ‘conquered’ its own content moderation, which leads to the question, what moderation?

    Granted, Facebook has had its own controversies lately with Facebook Live being used to broadcast a number of crimes and suicides, and the ever-growing problem of hate speech, however craigslist should not be held up as a shining example of how content should be moderated. In researching this post, it took me literally under a minute to see something racist posted in craigslist’s forum section. That’s not even taking into account the number of news stories that go out almost daily that contain the words ‘beware’ and ‘craigslist’.

    Let’s not forget the 115 victims that have been allegedly killed during craigslist transactions.

    If anything, craigslist could learn from Facebook. While craigslist only has 40 employees, Facebook has hired contracted content moderators to at least try to curb some of the material that goes against Facebook’s terms of service. Craigslist wouldn’t even remove their adult ads section until well after CNN’s Amber Lyon famously approached craigslist founder Craig Newmark, as pictured above, about the human trafficking that took place on craigslist.

    The only thing that craigslist can teach is how not to do things.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel